That was my first reaction when I saw the headline in the ‘Inspired’ section of the Daily Mail.  I’d worked with the journalist, the phenomenal Liz Hoggard, a few days earlier to review her home and explain how Interiors Therapy combined with clearing clutter can transform the way our homes support us.

As Valentine’s Day was approaching, the Daily Mail’s focus for the article was fixed firmly on love and asked whether the currently single Liz was being held back by her home. Apparently ‘manrepeller’ is a word hot from the fashion world.  It’s not one I’d ever use for what we do with Interiors Therapy, but it certainly got some attention!

Interiors therapy works on the home and everyone who lives in it.  By identifying imagery, blocks and clutter which have become invisible to the client and helping them to understand its impact, the client can choose to either remain as they are, or make changes to push their life forward.

I’ve been doing this work for over 20 years and feel very passionate about the transformation people can experience in their lives when they aren’t held back by their past or the possessions keep around them.   The lovely Marie Kondo was just 14 when I helped my first ‘client’ and it’s fantastic to see the way her Netflix series highlights the power of clearing clutter and reconnecting with your space. The revelation that Jennifer Aniston used an Interiors Therapist to refresh her home after her divorce made people more aware of the power possessions can have over us and got the ball rolling for Interiors Therapy in the UK.

It’s fair to say the article touched a nerve for many people as it ricocheted around the world, generating brilliantly funny tweets and a number of reviews in other publications in the UK and internationally.

The great thing is, it also made people think.

One lady rang to thank me for explaining images of single women (or men!) aren’t helpful if you are interested in being part of a couple… whether heterosexual or same sex.  She and her friends had realised their own homes were bursting with cards, photos and art depicting people on their own. They all wanted to change their relationship status and were using the article as a blueprint.

Primed by the Daily Mail, Scott had gone home and emptied his overstuffed bookshelves, keeping only the books he loved and wanted to read again. During the process he had found money, treasured photos and a precious book he thought had been lost. He became very emotional as he told me a huge weight had lifted and he had slept well for the first time in years.

Then of course there were the wonderful people who booked consultations and coaching.

With radio interviews for BBC Radio 5 Live and Cork’s 96FM along with some other interesting propositions, Liz Hoggard’s piece certainly created waves and opened the eyes of readers to the ways in which their homes could be blocking them from enjoying the life they desire.  I’d like to express my gratitude to the Daily Mail for changing the lives of so many people with Interiors Therapy, and am looking forward to teaming up with Liz again after she has cleared her space.

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